Period Style Hardware

Period Style & Antique or Vintage Hardware

Archive for the ‘Art Deco’ Category

Dummy Doors

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Previously, we featured some of our beautiful door hardware, but didn’t delve into the types of hardware options we offer. Let’s look a bit more closely at the various types, so that placing your order will be a breeze. In this post, we’ll focus on interior doors only, but will address entryway or exterior doors next.There are four main types of doorknobs to consider when deciding what you need for your home. These descriptions will help you sort out your needs.

First, single dummy knobs consist of a knob only on one side of the door. These would be appropriate for a closet door with a magnetic or ball catch or on a bi-fold door.

single dummy

Solid Brass Round Dummy Door Knob (Georgian Roped Plate Polished Chrome)

The second type of doorknob is the double dummy style, consisting of a knob on each side of the door, but do not turn or operate a latch mechanism. An example of where these might be used would be on french doors.

Passage style knobs are a third type of doorknob we have available. These are a pair of knobs, one on each side of the door, which turn and operate a latch mechanism. These most often are used on closet doors, french doors, or doors that include a separate deadbolt.

Our last option is traditionally used for bedroom and bathroom doors. The privacy style doorknobs turn, latch, and offer a locking mechanism. This type may be unlocked from the outside in an emergency by using a long push pin.

Solid Brass Round Functioning Door Knob (Georgian Roped Plate Polished Chrome)

Whatever your door needs, we offer a wide variety of interior styles. All the types mentioned above are available in a variety of materials and finishes, such as Polished Brass, Antique Brass, Polished Chrome, Brushed Nickel and Oil Rubbed Bronze, designed  to match your home decor. Hopefully this information assists you in deciding which doorknobs you need to upgrade your home.

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Written by booksnbeaches

July 24, 2013 at 10:06 pm

Through The Window -Selections in Hardware for Your Windows

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I remember, I remember
The house where I was born,
The little window where the sun
Came peeping in at morn:
It never came a minute too soon
Nor brought too long a day.

                                               ~Thomas Hood

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Rectangular Georgian Roped Solid Brass Sash Pull (Polished Brass)

Windows are funny little things, or big things, depending upon construction and edifice. Most are functional, utilitarian in nature, serving a purpose and for the most part going unappreciated. Granted, occasionally we come upon a breathtaking stained glass window, a large landscape revealing plate glass wall, or a tiny adorable notion of an opening with rippled panes of glass. But, the usual window is a standard affair.

Here at Look in the Attic & Company, we aim to help you take your mundane window and dress it up a bit. The sash locks and pulls we offer provide you with the rich details needed to make your windows a striking feature in your home. We offer a variety of styles to match your period restoration or to enhance your contemporary construction. Take a look at these examples, then visit our website for even more. You’ll find the sash accessories to complete your windows with style and charm.

Eastlake Solid Brass Window Lock in Polished Brass.

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Art Deco Style Window Sash Lock in Japanned Style Finish

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Broken Leaf Solid Brass Sash Pull in Antique Brass Finish

He jests at scars that never felt a wound.
But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.

~William Shakespeare

The Gatsby Glamour

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17 Inch Art Deco Close to Ceiling Light with Polished Chrome Finish and Pink Champagne Glass

Here at Look in the Attic & Company, we anxiously awaited the movie release of the Art Deco Classic, The Great Gatsby. Perhaps you anticipated the film from the literary standpoint of a great American classic novel, but we couldn’t wait for the cinematic release, which promised to be a lush portrayal of the glamour and glitz of the Art Deco Age. And we are here to say, we were not disappointed!

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17 Inch Art Deco Close to Ceiling Light with Polished Chrome Finish and Green Deco Glass

Lighting was a key element in setting the mood and style of the movie. At Look in the Attic & Company, our Art Deco lighting is an accurate reflection of the elegance and craftsmanship of the time period. Our featured Art Deco light is a 17 Inch Close to Ceiling Light, in a circa 1936 style, hand crafted from zinc using the Lost Wax casting method. The light comes with seven Pink Champagne stained glass panels, is made from solid brass construction and weighs approximately 12.5 pounds.  Each chandelier has seven custom made stained glass panels with color choices including Shadeless, White Opalescent, Pink Champagne (shown), Tan Swirl and Deco Green.

There were so many beautiful details in the movie, watching it once was not enough. No matter how many times you watch, we hope you feel inspired to bring a little Art Deco glamour into your home.

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17 Inch Art Deco Close to Ceiling Light with Polished Chrome Finish and White Opalescent Glass

The Glamour of Art Deco

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Flappers, gangsters, speakeasies and skyscrapers all bring to mind the Roaring 20’s and the heyday of the Art Deco movement. Add a dash of Harlem Renaissance, the Jazz Age, and industrial growth, and the boom of the era is edified in the art, architecture and interior design of the day. Streamlined, sleek furniture, glamorous fixtures and detailed symmetrical finishes adorning everything from salt and pepper shakers to the Chrysler building are examples of this design movement. The prosperity of the day was signified in the luxurious attention to detail and travel to exotic locales was a theme visited in many of the motifs.

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French Art Deco Amber Slip Shade Wall Sconce

Furniture design followed suit, with sleek lines and geometric emphasis. Sophisticated materials such as black lacquer, chrome and glass gave furnishings a modern almost futuristic look that had not been seen before. Even the hardware on bureaus, side tables, and cabinetry reflected the desire to achieve an exciting blend of materials and craftsmanship as the future was embraced through art and design.

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Art Deco Style Door Pull & Plate in a Polished Brass Finish

Here at Look in the Attic & Company, we have embraced Art Deco as well, crafting an exciting selection of hardware reproductions to offer discerning customers. Whether your original Art Deco furniture needs replacement hardware or your decorating tastes turn to the style, you’ll find what you need at our website. Remember many of the items in our collections are available in an array of finishes. Let us help you achieve the glamour of Art Deco in your home today.

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Solid Brass Marquee Pull in a Polished Brass Finish

Written by booksnbeaches

May 6, 2013 at 8:38 pm

Broken Leaf Pattern Pocket Door Hardware

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     The Broken Leaf pattern has long been a popular choice in door hardware, and is exceptionally popular when it comes to pocket doors.  Pocket doors are a great way to make a room feel open while still allowing for privacy when necessary.  While many times these doors remain in their hidden position, many people still find it necessary to provide ample decoration just like with any other door in their home.

broken leaf door pull, polished brass finish

     The broken leaf pattern is intricately detailed, and is available in several different finishes.  It is easy to see that this pattern is best displayed in the antique brass finish, but it still looks fantastic in the polished brass as well as the oiled bronze.  While there are several different options available for pocket door pulls, there are also coordinating push plates available, in addition to pocket door cup style handles.

 

broken leaf style push plate, antique brass finish

     Whether you want to coordinate with other pieces of hardware in your home or just want to create a statement on your pocket doors, the Broken Leaf pattern is definitely a piece that can do this for you.  The amount of intricate details on each of these pieces adds a special touch to any home, and easily blends in with nearly any style of home décor.

a broken leaf entryway set

 

     These pieces are available in a multitude of styles, including locking ones, and there are several different ways you can purchase them.  One of the most popular options is to purchase a set that includes door pulls, strike plates, latches, keys (privacy style only) as well as all of the mounting hardware you need to make sure they are securely installed and that the hardware doesn’t create an unwanted statement.

Written by antiqueswriter

September 6, 2011 at 8:24 am

Art Deco Push and Pull Door Plates

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     Art Deco is characterized by a linear, hard edge or angular composition, often with a vertical emphasis, and highlighted with stylized decoration (according to Blumenson). Art Deco is an eclectic artistic and design style that began in Paris in the 1920s  and flourished internationally throughout the 1930s, into the World War II era. The style influenced all areas of design, including architecture and interior design, industrial design, fashion and jewelry, as well as the visual arts such as painting, graphic arts and film.

     The Art Deco style has become quite popular in home décor due to its versatility and uniqueness.  The style typically features clean lines and geometric patterns, usually carved into the metal so as to add contrast, or embossed on the surface to help it stand out.   There are several different methods used to create such designs, though creating a mold and pouring molten metal is a popular method, and can be fairly fast to do.  It is especially popular when making pairs of door plates, ensuring that the two pieces will match exactly.

It easy to see the similarities between art deco architecture and art deco interior design. We nick named this plate "The Chrysler".

 

 

     Etching a design into the piece is generally done when a pattern is placed on the solid metal and an acid, or other chemical compound, is used to eat away at the exposed metal.  The result is a design embedded into the metal.  It is not uncommon to have color differences in the metals, allowing the pattern to stand out a little more.  This is especially the case in the push plates featured in bronze and copper.

A brilliant example of the intricate detail that goes into art deco design elements.

 

     Our pieces are available in many different finishes and metals, making it easy to find just the right one for your home or particular room you are decorating.  Art Deco is an especially nice style for decorating, since it is extremely versatile and can match any current décor.  If you prefer your décor to stand out and make a statement, consider perhaps one of the more extravagantly decorated plates.  You can also choose plates in a metal that contrast with the rest of the décor or the color of the doors they are applied to.  Polished brass pieces look brilliant on a white door, and copper pieces on a dark colored wood add just enough color difference to be noticeable.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 1, 2011 at 8:45 am

Richardsonian Romanesque Architecture and Interior Design Elements

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     Richardsonian Romanesque is a style of architecture that was named after Boston architect Henry Hobson Richardson  Richardson became famous in the late 1800’s.  One of his most famous and popular works is the Trinity Church in Boston, which is now listed as a historical landmark, protecting it for generations to enjoy in the future.  Most of his pieces originated on the East coast, and Boston would become host to several of these buildings.   This architectural style combines aspects of French, Spanish, and Italian architecture, especially that from the 11th and 12th century.

     Richardson’s style became so popular and unique in the United States that it influenced several architects as far away as Finland.  In fact, its popularity in the United States inspired many people who would go on to become great architects.  Perhaps one of the most famous of these people inspired by him is Frank Lloyd Wright. Other famous Richardson buildings include the American Museum of Natural History’s original 77th Street structure, First Presbyterian Church in Detroit, MI on Woodward Avenue, and the Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane in New York State.

     This style is generally considered too elaborate for many homes, but was an extremely popular choice for churches, museums, and other government buildings.  In fact, one of the other most famous buildings in the Richardsonian style is the Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane in upstate New York.

     Common characteristics of Richardson Romanesque include;  heavy, rusticated stone materials, semi-circular arches, deeply recessed windows, towers with cone shaped roofs (very castle-like), and low broad arches over arcades and doorways. Most Romanesque buildings are masonry, although there are a fair few wood and shingle Romanesque style buildings.

     Richardsonian architecture doesn’t really follow any particular style, and tends to borrow elements from several different ones instead.  No two buildings are alike, and although they may share similar elements are more like buildings built in two completely different styles.   Richardson’s style can be seen all over the United States, especially in major cities.  His buildings were commissioned by many local and state governments to make a statement as well as provide an eye-catching and functional building for many to enjoy over decades, even centuries.

Written by antiqueswriter

June 20, 2011 at 9:04 am