Period Style Hardware

Period Style & Antique or Vintage Hardware

Posts Tagged ‘copper

Victorian Porcelain Door Knobs

leave a comment »

     Porcelain door knobs are a gorgeous addition to any home.  The Victorian style that is usually a staple of these pieces is very subtle, allowing them to blend in with the current style of your home, even if it isn’t Victorian in style.  These pieces are the same size as a standard door knob, making them the ideal piece to adorn any door in your home.

     You have your choice of base finish for these knobs.  While polished brass is one of the most popular choices, you can also choose antique brass, polished chrome, brushed nickel and oil-rubbed bronze.  We also offer two different knob choices; white or black.  Each knob is constructed out of pure porcelain.  The white knobs add a kind of elegant finish to the doors, while the black makes a much bolder statement.  Porcelain door knobs used to be extremely popular in many homes as an easy way to add an elegant touch to any décor.  It was also a very inexpensive way to do some minor redecorating, and remains the same way today.  Door knobs are easily interchangeable, and with so many finishes available you can easily adapt them to one style, or many different ones depending on how you decorated your home.

A functional knob, black porcelain with a polished brass finish

 

     Porcelain door knobs are best used inside the house, rather than on the front door.  To keep them in the best shape as long as possible, you may want to refrain from installing them on any door that may be subject to getting hit or has the potential to be damaged.  It is not uncommon for porcelain knobs to become damaged over time, as they are made from a fragile material. While it is extremely rare for them to become shattered, small cracks appearing are commonplace.  These knobs can be purchased singularly or in a double set, and as always any mounting screws necessary are included.

Advertisements

Art Deco Push and Pull Door Plates

with one comment

     Art Deco is characterized by a linear, hard edge or angular composition, often with a vertical emphasis, and highlighted with stylized decoration (according to Blumenson). Art Deco is an eclectic artistic and design style that began in Paris in the 1920s  and flourished internationally throughout the 1930s, into the World War II era. The style influenced all areas of design, including architecture and interior design, industrial design, fashion and jewelry, as well as the visual arts such as painting, graphic arts and film.

     The Art Deco style has become quite popular in home décor due to its versatility and uniqueness.  The style typically features clean lines and geometric patterns, usually carved into the metal so as to add contrast, or embossed on the surface to help it stand out.   There are several different methods used to create such designs, though creating a mold and pouring molten metal is a popular method, and can be fairly fast to do.  It is especially popular when making pairs of door plates, ensuring that the two pieces will match exactly.

It easy to see the similarities between art deco architecture and art deco interior design. We nick named this plate "The Chrysler".

 

 

     Etching a design into the piece is generally done when a pattern is placed on the solid metal and an acid, or other chemical compound, is used to eat away at the exposed metal.  The result is a design embedded into the metal.  It is not uncommon to have color differences in the metals, allowing the pattern to stand out a little more.  This is especially the case in the push plates featured in bronze and copper.

A brilliant example of the intricate detail that goes into art deco design elements.

 

     Our pieces are available in many different finishes and metals, making it easy to find just the right one for your home or particular room you are decorating.  Art Deco is an especially nice style for decorating, since it is extremely versatile and can match any current décor.  If you prefer your décor to stand out and make a statement, consider perhaps one of the more extravagantly decorated plates.  You can also choose plates in a metal that contrast with the rest of the décor or the color of the doors they are applied to.  Polished brass pieces look brilliant on a white door, and copper pieces on a dark colored wood add just enough color difference to be noticeable.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 1, 2011 at 8:45 am

Victorian Mail Slots

leave a comment »

     Mail slots were once the preferred method of receiving your mail on a daily basis instead of the more modern mailbox that is mounted on a post by the side of the road.  This is especially true in rural areas where the most efficient way to get from building to building is by motorized vehicle.  There are still some areas throughout the country that have mail carriers who deliver on foot, and for locations like these mail slots may still be used.

One of the characteristics of a victorian style mail slot is the intricate design around the edges.

     Many homes, especially restorations, are installing mail slots on their doors to add a sense of whimsy or nostalgia to the home rather than for their functionality.  We have recognized the popularity of these items, and strive to carry a large selection of different kinds of mail slots, so there is at least one choice for every home style.  Mail slots tend to be overlooked on homes in which they are commonly used, but that doesn’t mean they need to be any less decorative.

     The Victorian style tends to be the most decorative in all of its components, from construction of homes and exterior decorations to the little details that can be found on any piece of hardware.  Mail slots are no exception.  While there is an overall design that can be seen, it’s the intricate details that are all along the exterior border that make the biggest difference.  Much time is taken to make sure that the border enhances the piece and draws the eye toward the overall design of the piece, rather than noticing one particular element at a time.

A victorian mail slot with a brushed nickel finish.

   Victorian mail slots are available in a myriad of different finishes, including polished chrome, oil rubbed bronze, polished and antique brass as well as nickel plated.  The antique brass seems to be the most classic and popular option, and really lets the design of the piece to stand out.  We list all the dimensions on our website to ensure that you get the right size mail slot, and include all mounting hardware necessary to complete your project.

Written by antiqueswriter

July 27, 2011 at 9:14 am

Arts and Crafts Door Pulls

leave a comment »

     Arts and Crafts style homes, often referred to as Craftsman style homes, pride themselves on using local man-made materials to construct not only the exterior of the home but all of the interior decorations and hardware as well.  This includes any door handles, hinges, switch plates, as well as pieces of furniture like beds, chairs and tables.  While these styles of homes may be adorned with traditional brass metals, pewter and copper are the most popular.

the popular rice pattern

 

     If you are renovating your Craftsman style home, our website has a wide variety of hardware pieces to choose from in this style and most of them are available in the most popular finishes.  We carry an especially large selection of door pulls and handles, since these tend to be not only the most popular pieces of hardware purchased, but also the ones that tend to make the biggest statement.  One of the first things people notice when they arrive at your home for this first time, aside from the exterior structure itself, is the door handle.  Whether or not it makes a statement, or how much of one, is a decision up to the owner, and the finish choice has a lot to do with this.

Pewter is one of the most popular materials for manufacturing craftsman style pulls.

    

     Pewter will stand out more against a light-colored door but at the same time can add a simple touch.  Copper on the other hand tends to add a statement no matter what the finish of the door is.   New copper has a sheen that cannot be duplicated with any other metal, and the patina that develops over time adds an additional touch.  Natural patinas tend to preferred to chemically created ones, and can only truly be appreciated over time.

    

 

     All of the Arts and Crafts style door pulls and door handles we feature ship in a timely manner with all the mounting hardware you will need to install it, saving you the time and trouble of finding just the right pieces to finish the job.

 

Written by antiqueswriter

July 25, 2011 at 9:03 am

Origins of the Fleur de Lis design – Door Knockers

leave a comment »

     The Fleur de Lis design has been immensely popular throughout European history, but is almost always associated with the French monarchy, although it has never been officially recognized by the French government.  It is still predominantly used on coats of arms throughout the region, more specifically with the King of Spain and the house of Bourbon, as well as many French-speaking Canadian provinces.

A fleur de lis door knocker finished in polished brass.

 

    The name Fleur de Lis translates into ‘lily flower’ although it is actually more similar to an iris than a lily.  It is said to have actually been named for the flowers of the river lis, which were irises.  Since saying that is quite a mouthful, the name was shortened.  While there are some documents that support this theory, few remain intact as this was before the 12th century, B.C.

This curtain tie-back displays the ornate usage of the fleur de lis.

 

   The ties between the symbol and the French monarchy can be traced back to the twelfth century, when kings Louis VI and Louis VII started using the design as propaganda on scepters trying to help portray themselves as saints.  Further uses of this design in France were on their nation’s flag, a banner that has changed several times over the centuries to include or remove it.

            In modern times, this symbol is often used as a decorative element on everything from the tops of fences, the arms of crosses and in many scouting troop uniforms, such as the Boy Scouts of America.  It is also very prevalent as elegant touches on homes in the forms of door knockers, or embellishments on door handles or other pieces of cabinetry hardware. The fleur-de-lis is the main element in the logo of most Scouting organizations, representing a major theme in Scouting: the outdoors and wilderness. The World Scout Emblem of the World Organization of the Scout Movement, has elements of which are used by most national Scout organizations. The symbol was chosen by Sir Robert Baden-Powell as it had been the arm-badge of those soldiers qualified as “Scouts” (reconnaissance specialists) when he served in the British Army. The classical description of this shape in Scouting literature connects the compass rose with the purpose of Scouting’s principles—namely that Scouting gives one’s life direction. The stars stand for truth and knowledge, the encircling rope for unity and its reef knot service. 

The fleur de lis design appears even in something so simple as this cabinet knob.

 

From this angle you can see the striking block beneath the knocker.

  

 

      These door knockers come in your choice of six different finishes (antique copper is pictured to the right) so that you may best accent your front door.  Included with each one is a striking block as well as a pair of mounting screws in a matching finish.

 

 

Written by antiqueswriter

June 28, 2011 at 9:12 am

Embossed Copper Door Knobs for Modern and Antique Doors

with one comment

Here is the last piece we are going to be featuring from our friendly neighbor’s house.  This is another beautiful example of how gorgeous an embossed piece can be with the right talent.  This is not an art form for the beginner.  In fact, many experienced artists don’t take the time to learn it since it can be so tedious and time consuming.  The ones that do learn it and take the time to make it their specialty really do end up producing some absolutely stunning works of art.

This embossed copper door knob is most likely done by the same artist as the Fleur de Lis piece.  It is a much later design, featuring many more advanced techniques and showing off a lot more skill than it’s predecessor.  It is also possible that this piece was created by the master if it was part of an apprenticeship, which is still quite common in the area of metal working.  Unlike olden times, apprenticeships come with much better pay, and the schedules as well as all workers involved are much more lenient, as most of them have employment standards that must be followed.

embossed copper door knob

This piece has nearly four times as much detail as the other piece, and while some people may think that this piece was an example of engraving, if you look closely at the edges of the design, they are slightly softer than the hard edges created by a chisel and hammer.  These smooth transitions are a clear indicator of embossing.  Another giveaway is the location of the design.  Many embossed pieces, especially door knobs, choose to add the decoration to the edge of the piece.  This helps the design hold up longer than if it were in the middle.  Since the piece is created from back to front, with the back being hollow, there is a greater risk of denting and damaging the design, so placement is crucial.

Written by antiqueswriter

May 11, 2011 at 12:35 pm

Another Peephole!

with 2 comments

This is another piece that we recovered from the house fire we found the silhouette drawer handle.  This one fared much better than the other piece, most likely because it was buried under a bunch of other stuff in the basement.  There were several boxes that didn’t seem to really be affected by the fire as much as the others, but many items in the basement were that way.  While they did suffer water and smoke damage, that can easily be cleaned off.

This peephole is far different from the other one we just featured.  It is much newer in style, boasting a much more in depth engraved surface.  While the other piece had a swing open door to view who was on the other side, this piece has a small hole in which you can peer through.  The opening is a fraction of the size of the other as well, making it the perfect replacement for the boring peephole found on most doors and apartment complexes.

Peephole 2

It is extremely easy to assemble, and only requires three screws, which of course will be provided for you when you purchase this piece.  The screw holes were integrated into the design of the piece, so that they blend into the piece, rather than obstruct it.  While the original piece has been cast in copper, this piece will also be available in several other finishes so that you can choose the one that best fits your personality and decorator style.

It takes a true artist to craft such a modern yet classic piece, and the creator of this one is no different.  They decided to use shape as the defining factor, and with a steady hand carved and elaborate yet simplistic scroll design on the surface to add a bit of depth and dimension.  What would you do to accent a piece like this?

Written by antiqueswriter

April 5, 2011 at 8:37 am