Period Style Hardware

Period Style & Antique or Vintage Hardware

Archive for the ‘French Empire’ Category

Broken Leaf Pattern Pocket Door Hardware

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     The Broken Leaf pattern has long been a popular choice in door hardware, and is exceptionally popular when it comes to pocket doors.  Pocket doors are a great way to make a room feel open while still allowing for privacy when necessary.  While many times these doors remain in their hidden position, many people still find it necessary to provide ample decoration just like with any other door in their home.

broken leaf door pull, polished brass finish

     The broken leaf pattern is intricately detailed, and is available in several different finishes.  It is easy to see that this pattern is best displayed in the antique brass finish, but it still looks fantastic in the polished brass as well as the oiled bronze.  While there are several different options available for pocket door pulls, there are also coordinating push plates available, in addition to pocket door cup style handles.

 

broken leaf style push plate, antique brass finish

     Whether you want to coordinate with other pieces of hardware in your home or just want to create a statement on your pocket doors, the Broken Leaf pattern is definitely a piece that can do this for you.  The amount of intricate details on each of these pieces adds a special touch to any home, and easily blends in with nearly any style of home décor.

a broken leaf entryway set

 

     These pieces are available in a multitude of styles, including locking ones, and there are several different ways you can purchase them.  One of the most popular options is to purchase a set that includes door pulls, strike plates, latches, keys (privacy style only) as well as all of the mounting hardware you need to make sure they are securely installed and that the hardware doesn’t create an unwanted statement.

Written by antiqueswriter

September 6, 2011 at 8:24 am

Eastlake Door Bells

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     Almost every home out there has a doorbell attached to the front door, but very few people take the time to coordinate these items to the rest of the hardware in their home.  By taking the extra time and making an effort to choose a doorbell that matches the door handles and other hardware you are showing people that you appreciate antiques and the statement they can make for your home.

One example of the very popular Eastlake style doorbell.

     The Eastlake style is very popular when it comes people wanting to make a statement with their hardware they display in their home. The Eastlake Movement was a nineteenth century architectural and household design reform movement started by architect and writer Charles Eastlake (1836–1906). The movement is generally considered part of the late 19th century period in terms of broad antique furniture designations. In architecture the Eastlake Style is part of the Queen Anne style of Victorian architecture. This style features intricately detailed carvings and engravings, generally out of only geometric shapes.  All of these details were created by using machinery, a modern invention at the inception of this architectural style.  While the pieces may be elaborately decorated, the focus of the Eastlake style is simplicity; this is why the geometric shapes have such a predominant focus.

A classic example of a mechanical "turn" bell.

     Door bells have changed drastically over the decades.  Where they used to be ropes attached to a bell inside the home, they have now transitioned to electric versions.  While the chime boxes inside the home may still be somewhat discreet, it is not uncommon to have a more decorative back plate to adorn the bell itself on the exterior of the home.  Not only does this make it more cohesive to the rest of the home’s style, but it helps it to stand out more for those who are looking to use the doorbell.We have several different styles and shapes available for the Eastlake door bells, as well as a variety of finishes

Another fine example of eastlake style detail and polished brass finish.

     Don’t forget to take into consideration the shape of your doorway and what kind of statement you want to make when making your choice on shape.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 30, 2011 at 8:30 am

Victorian Door Numbers

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     Paris is said to have been the first city to introduce house numbering, on the Pont Notre-Dame in 1512. British houses started being numbered with the Postage Act of 1765. In rural areas many houses remain named but un-numbered. The odd numbers will typically, although not always, be on the left-hand side as seen from the centre of the town or village, with the lowest numbers at the end of the street closest to the town centre. House numbering is common in many areas of the world, all with a different system or plan.

 

     There is nothing more frustrating than trying to find an address on a building or home only to discover that they don’t have house numbers displayed, or that they are faded and worn off.  These Victorian house numbers are available in a variety of sizes range from just a couple of inches to a much larger six inch size, making it possible to see your house number from a greater distance.   There are also a couple of different finish options available, with polished brass providing a very classic look.

 

    

      While some people may find the look to be just the touch your home needs, others want something a little more maintenance free.  The solution for this can be found with our hand-forged iron numbers.  The four inch size is perfect to view house numbers mounted on doors and walls of homes to be seen clearly from the street.  The hand-forged aspect adds a touch that cannot be matched in any other finish.  This style blends very well with a variety of different door hardware, including cast iron, oil rubbed bronze, and other dark finishes.   Since these numbers are hand forged, no two are exactly alike.  This adds a wonderful touch and provides a unique quality that many people are looking for.  House numbers, while some people may think are obsolete, are absolutely necessary, especially if an emergency should arise.  Mounting screws are included with each number to allow them to be securely attached to any building material.  It is possible to add a little bit of a sheen on these numbers if you like by polishing them, but most people prefer the darkened areas that are created when these numbers are struck during the forging process.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 16, 2011 at 9:04 am

Ribbon and Reed Pattern Lion Door Knocker

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Door knockers are a piece of ancient hardware history, and were at the height of their popularity about one hundred years ago.  This was back in the days before cell phones and electric door knobs.  It was common to find a home that had a bell-pull type door knob; these were typically on the more elaborately decorated homes of the wealthy. It was more likely that you would find a door knocker on a home instead.

Antique Brass Ribbon and Reed Lion Door Knocker

Antique Brass Ribbon and Reed Lion Door Knocker

Depending on your financial status depended on how decorative of a door knocker your home would have, or if you would have one at all.  The wealthier you were, the more decorative the style.  The wealthiest people would generally have a door knocker in the shape of an animal head, with a lion’s head being the most famous and popular ones.  Door knockers like these can be found on some of the most famous buildings throughout the United States as well as the U.K.

Manufactured in Two Sizes - 8 Finishes

Manufactured in Two Sizes - 8 Finishes

The people who came up with the designs for many of the Ribbon and Reed style door knockers have a real eye for detail.  They are exceptional at getting just enough detail in the animal heads while providing just a small amount on the ring.  These items were typically cast in polished brass so they would stand out, but copper and pewter also became popular over the years.

Made from Solid Bronze and Brass

Made from Solid Bronze and Brass

We offer this piece in two sizes – and several different finishes to match the décor of your home.  Antique bronze is the most popular, with the classic polished brass in a close second, followed by the oil rubbed bronze.  As always, we include the mounting hardware for the piece with your order in the same finish you have selected to eliminate the hassle of having to match it from the hardware store, or having to guess what size screw(s) you will need.

Origins of the Fleur de Lis design – Door Knockers

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     The Fleur de Lis design has been immensely popular throughout European history, but is almost always associated with the French monarchy, although it has never been officially recognized by the French government.  It is still predominantly used on coats of arms throughout the region, more specifically with the King of Spain and the house of Bourbon, as well as many French-speaking Canadian provinces.

A fleur de lis door knocker finished in polished brass.

 

    The name Fleur de Lis translates into ‘lily flower’ although it is actually more similar to an iris than a lily.  It is said to have actually been named for the flowers of the river lis, which were irises.  Since saying that is quite a mouthful, the name was shortened.  While there are some documents that support this theory, few remain intact as this was before the 12th century, B.C.

This curtain tie-back displays the ornate usage of the fleur de lis.

 

   The ties between the symbol and the French monarchy can be traced back to the twelfth century, when kings Louis VI and Louis VII started using the design as propaganda on scepters trying to help portray themselves as saints.  Further uses of this design in France were on their nation’s flag, a banner that has changed several times over the centuries to include or remove it.

            In modern times, this symbol is often used as a decorative element on everything from the tops of fences, the arms of crosses and in many scouting troop uniforms, such as the Boy Scouts of America.  It is also very prevalent as elegant touches on homes in the forms of door knockers, or embellishments on door handles or other pieces of cabinetry hardware. The fleur-de-lis is the main element in the logo of most Scouting organizations, representing a major theme in Scouting: the outdoors and wilderness. The World Scout Emblem of the World Organization of the Scout Movement, has elements of which are used by most national Scout organizations. The symbol was chosen by Sir Robert Baden-Powell as it had been the arm-badge of those soldiers qualified as “Scouts” (reconnaissance specialists) when he served in the British Army. The classical description of this shape in Scouting literature connects the compass rose with the purpose of Scouting’s principles—namely that Scouting gives one’s life direction. The stars stand for truth and knowledge, the encircling rope for unity and its reef knot service. 

The fleur de lis design appears even in something so simple as this cabinet knob.

 

From this angle you can see the striking block beneath the knocker.

  

 

      These door knockers come in your choice of six different finishes (antique copper is pictured to the right) so that you may best accent your front door.  Included with each one is a striking block as well as a pair of mounting screws in a matching finish.

 

 

Written by antiqueswriter

June 28, 2011 at 9:12 am

Neoclasscial Architecture

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The Neoclassical architectural style came to be in the mid 18th century in Spain and Poland, and was heavily influenced by classical Greek architecture as well as by Italian architect Andrea Palladino.  Many of the details of the style can be compared to the Rococo style as well as the Late Baroque.  One of the biggest differences between the Neoclassical style and the classic Greek style is the Neoclassical focuses more on the walls, where the Greek prided themselves on their proficiency in chiaroscuro.  Some historians go even further to suggest that this style came about so that architects could embrace the sensitivity of ancient Rome combined with ancient Greek.

This architectural style was a worldwide phenomenon that occurred at more or less the same time throughout the globe, rather than eventually spreading to the United States and Europe.  Many people don’t see the distinction between the High Neoclassical style and the Late Baroque, as they tend to have the same terms associated with them but the High Neoclassical style tends to have more planar qualities than sculptured ones.  All aspects of the former are flatter depth-wise, especially the bas-reliefs.  Where these may be built directly into the wall in a Late Baroque sculpture, they were more often framed in panels, tablets, or friezes in a High Neoclassical one.

Buildings portraying this style can be found all over the globe but some are more popular than others.  The Old Museum in Berlin, one of Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s projects, Sir John Soane’s Bank of England in London are popular European examples.  There are two extremely famous ones in the United States as well; the White House and the Capitol, both in Washington, D.C.

Written by antiqueswriter

June 22, 2011 at 9:31 am

Ranch Style

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     Ranch style homes are both famous and popular for their mainly one-story construction.  Some Ranch style homes may have a second story bedroom built in, or maybe just a loft area.  This style home is popular all over the United States and Canada, and can be found in other parts of the world as well.  They fit into many different architectural styles and can be decorated in almost any style, making it extremely versatile and sought after.

    

     This type of home is especially beneficial to those who have trouble with stairs, or are just tired of running up and down the stairs all day.  The sprawling floor plans allow for larger homes, but do require more acreage to build on, which may end up costing more but can be very much worth it.  Some of the prettiest ranch style homes feature brick as the main building material, though stucco and siding are also quite popular.

    

     Ranch-style homes feature one or more of these characteristics; a single story roof, a low pitch gabled roof, deep set eves, long, low horizontal layouts, large windows, attached garages, simple floor plans, emphasis on open space, natural building materials or simple, not decorative detailing.  Ranch style interiors share some of those characteristics, focusing on open layouts, simple design and long, open spaces.

 

 

     The Ranch style home came about in the 1920’s but really became popular from the 1940’s to the 1970’s.  Exterior decoration on these homes are kept to a minimum, and many times there is not a whole lot of decoration on the interior either.  Lines are kept clean, open door ways and living areas are popular, as well as an open kitchen and combined breakfast area.  Garages are usually attached, and may or may not feature a bonus room of sorts in the space above them.

 

 

     Ranch style homes are the precursor to the more modern split-level, which was originally introduced as a “raised ranch” home.  This term referred to the fact that all or part of the basement level was above ground, raising a section of the otherwise-ranch.  Split-levels have since become their own style of home and are very rarely connected to ranch homes.

 

Written by antiqueswriter

June 21, 2011 at 8:56 am