Period Style Hardware

Period Style & Antique or Vintage Hardware

Posts Tagged ‘hardware

The Personal Touch

leave a comment »

 

Home is not only where the heart is, but it is the place that best reflects our interests, passions and personality. Our refuge from the world, it is that place where not only are we soothed, but we hope to convey to others a warm welcoming environment indicative of who we are. At Look in the Attic & Company, our hardware products help you achieve a look that is as unique and individual as you. The assortment of cabinet pulls we offer is always growing, but below are a few of our favorites.

For the lover of all things Western, horses, boots, and revolvers all can be mounted to your cabinetry.

horse boot

 

Western themed knobs and pulls for the cowboys and cowgirls

 

Wild animals roam through your home when you install the new series we have created, featuring giraffes, rhinos, elephants and more.

giraffe rhino elephant

 Our new wild animal knobs

 

And for those who hold a beloved pet in high esteem, we have manufactured a line of knobs replicating popular dog breeds. Labradors, beagles, German shepherds, and dachshund knobs all provide a bit of whimsy and speak to the dog lover out there.

 

german lab dach

Knobs to celebrate our favorite breeds of dogs

No matter what type of hardware it is you’re looking for to provide that personal touch, come view our selection at Look in the Attic & Company for excellent choices. We are constantly adding to our collection and would love to provide you with just the right cabinet pull to proclaim to the world your individuality.

Advertisements

Written by booksnbeaches

May 22, 2013 at 11:15 pm

The Glamour of Art Deco

leave a comment »

Flappers, gangsters, speakeasies and skyscrapers all bring to mind the Roaring 20’s and the heyday of the Art Deco movement. Add a dash of Harlem Renaissance, the Jazz Age, and industrial growth, and the boom of the era is edified in the art, architecture and interior design of the day. Streamlined, sleek furniture, glamorous fixtures and detailed symmetrical finishes adorning everything from salt and pepper shakers to the Chrysler building are examples of this design movement. The prosperity of the day was signified in the luxurious attention to detail and travel to exotic locales was a theme visited in many of the motifs.

Image

French Art Deco Amber Slip Shade Wall Sconce

Furniture design followed suit, with sleek lines and geometric emphasis. Sophisticated materials such as black lacquer, chrome and glass gave furnishings a modern almost futuristic look that had not been seen before. Even the hardware on bureaus, side tables, and cabinetry reflected the desire to achieve an exciting blend of materials and craftsmanship as the future was embraced through art and design.

Image

Art Deco Style Door Pull & Plate in a Polished Brass Finish

Here at Look in the Attic & Company, we have embraced Art Deco as well, crafting an exciting selection of hardware reproductions to offer discerning customers. Whether your original Art Deco furniture needs replacement hardware or your decorating tastes turn to the style, you’ll find what you need at our website. Remember many of the items in our collections are available in an array of finishes. Let us help you achieve the glamour of Art Deco in your home today.

Image

Solid Brass Marquee Pull in a Polished Brass Finish

Written by booksnbeaches

May 6, 2013 at 8:38 pm

Victorian Cup and Bin Pulls

leave a comment »

     Cup and Bin pulls are a great alternative to traditional drawer pulls and dresser hardware.  If you are tired of the annoying ‘knocking’ sound that often accompanies the opening or closing of a dresser drawer with a more traditional style of hardware, think about trying out this style instead.

decorative cup pull - finished in antique brass

     Cup and Bin pulls offer a more elegant and old-fashioned style of hardware decoration, and are ideal for any type of drawer, particularly those found on dressers and desks.  They are very simple and easy to install and can be a wonderful decorative element in any home.  All you need to replace any of these items is a simple screwdriver; we provide the screws and the pulls themselves.

A fine example of Victorian design work with an oil-rubbed bronze finish.

     You have your choice of several different designs.  Each design was carefully created by master craftsman.  While the items themselves are created in a mold, the molds themselves were delicately hand carved to ensure consistency, with every attention to detail carefully examined.  These pulls allow you to exhibit more detail than traditional swinging handles, and are much more durable.

It is easy to see how a well designed pull can breath new life into an otherwise drab piece of furniture.

     The decoration on the cup is very durable and easy to care for.  A simple swipe of a cloth gets rid of any dust, and depending on what finish you choose there is little more care necessary.  Swinging handles, while very common, are also very cheap.  They are rarely made of a solid metal, and the finish has a tendency to wear down over time.  While the decorative backplate of these designs holds up very well, the worn finish on the handles is very noticeable and cannot be easily replaced.  With cup pulls the design is made so well that it rarely wears down, and if it does it is very hard to notice.

Eastlake Door Bells

leave a comment »

     Almost every home out there has a doorbell attached to the front door, but very few people take the time to coordinate these items to the rest of the hardware in their home.  By taking the extra time and making an effort to choose a doorbell that matches the door handles and other hardware you are showing people that you appreciate antiques and the statement they can make for your home.

One example of the very popular Eastlake style doorbell.

     The Eastlake style is very popular when it comes people wanting to make a statement with their hardware they display in their home. The Eastlake Movement was a nineteenth century architectural and household design reform movement started by architect and writer Charles Eastlake (1836–1906). The movement is generally considered part of the late 19th century period in terms of broad antique furniture designations. In architecture the Eastlake Style is part of the Queen Anne style of Victorian architecture. This style features intricately detailed carvings and engravings, generally out of only geometric shapes.  All of these details were created by using machinery, a modern invention at the inception of this architectural style.  While the pieces may be elaborately decorated, the focus of the Eastlake style is simplicity; this is why the geometric shapes have such a predominant focus.

A classic example of a mechanical "turn" bell.

     Door bells have changed drastically over the decades.  Where they used to be ropes attached to a bell inside the home, they have now transitioned to electric versions.  While the chime boxes inside the home may still be somewhat discreet, it is not uncommon to have a more decorative back plate to adorn the bell itself on the exterior of the home.  Not only does this make it more cohesive to the rest of the home’s style, but it helps it to stand out more for those who are looking to use the doorbell.We have several different styles and shapes available for the Eastlake door bells, as well as a variety of finishes

Another fine example of eastlake style detail and polished brass finish.

     Don’t forget to take into consideration the shape of your doorway and what kind of statement you want to make when making your choice on shape.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 30, 2011 at 8:30 am

Mission Revival and Craftsman Drawer Pulls

leave a comment »

     The Mission Revival Style was an architectural movement that began in the late 19th century for a colonial style’s revivalism and reinterpretation, which drew inspiration from the late 18th and early 19th century Spanish missions in California.  The  movement enjoyed its greatest popularity between 1890 and 1915, through numerous residential, commercial, and institutional structures, particularly with schools and railroad depots, that used this easily recognizable architectural style.

    The Mission Revival style is often lumped in with the Craftsman style, and for good reason.  Not only do the two styles overlap one another, but they are also very similar in style and inspiration.  Both styles embraced very simplistic styles and made their main focus was using local materials and artists to create various pieces of hardware and furniture.

     These styles of homes embrace the Craftsman philosophy completely.  Since these styles of homes have generated a very strong following it is quite easy to find a variety of different hardware options to help the homeowners maintain the Craftsman philosophy.  While some homeowners focus on the structure itself many others put their efforts into the furniture and hardware of the home to make sure it all fits in the Craftsman style.

     The choices people have for drawer hardware is extensive, and narrowing it down by architectural style doesn’t make that much of a dent in the options, especially with these styles.  The most common choices for drawer pulls are very simple ring designs.  The plusses for this option is that they can help convert any simple piece of furniture into more of a Craftsman style quite easily, and look great on any piece.

 

There are many different finishes available as well, and no one finish looks better than another because of the simplicity of it, and they blend with each other quite nicely.  This means you can have one room with primarily polished brass accents and another with oil rubbed bronze or chrome.  The different finishes can give very different impressions allowing an even further expression of a person’s personality.  All of the drawer pulls include the mounting hardware, making it a quick and easy upgrade to any room in your home.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 23, 2011 at 8:29 am

Victorian Door Numbers

leave a comment »

     Paris is said to have been the first city to introduce house numbering, on the Pont Notre-Dame in 1512. British houses started being numbered with the Postage Act of 1765. In rural areas many houses remain named but un-numbered. The odd numbers will typically, although not always, be on the left-hand side as seen from the centre of the town or village, with the lowest numbers at the end of the street closest to the town centre. House numbering is common in many areas of the world, all with a different system or plan.

 

     There is nothing more frustrating than trying to find an address on a building or home only to discover that they don’t have house numbers displayed, or that they are faded and worn off.  These Victorian house numbers are available in a variety of sizes range from just a couple of inches to a much larger six inch size, making it possible to see your house number from a greater distance.   There are also a couple of different finish options available, with polished brass providing a very classic look.

 

    

      While some people may find the look to be just the touch your home needs, others want something a little more maintenance free.  The solution for this can be found with our hand-forged iron numbers.  The four inch size is perfect to view house numbers mounted on doors and walls of homes to be seen clearly from the street.  The hand-forged aspect adds a touch that cannot be matched in any other finish.  This style blends very well with a variety of different door hardware, including cast iron, oil rubbed bronze, and other dark finishes.   Since these numbers are hand forged, no two are exactly alike.  This adds a wonderful touch and provides a unique quality that many people are looking for.  House numbers, while some people may think are obsolete, are absolutely necessary, especially if an emergency should arise.  Mounting screws are included with each number to allow them to be securely attached to any building material.  It is possible to add a little bit of a sheen on these numbers if you like by polishing them, but most people prefer the darkened areas that are created when these numbers are struck during the forging process.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 16, 2011 at 9:04 am

Modern Kick Plates

leave a comment »

     Kick plates are an absolute necessity in most offices and retail stores, and even in some houses.  If you are one of those people who prefer to open doors with their feet, especially when your hands are full, then you understand how much damage the bottom of a door can sustain from this abuse.  Restaurants are notorious for using kick plates on their doors not only as a functional piece, but also to help keep the appearance of cleanliness.  Some homes are also starting to use kick plates in certain areas of their homes.  Most times these are used in basement areas like recreation rooms and playrooms, though some parents are also having them installed on doors into garages, back or side doors, and some kitchen doors.  People who have young children know how much of a hassle it can be to constantly be cleaning scuff marks off of doors from people who are too tired or unable to use a door knob instead of their feet to open doors.  The best thing about kick plates is that they are very simple and versatile.

6 inch tall solid antique brass kick plate.

 

     We carry many different finishes so you can match them easily to the hardware you already have in your home.  We also have many different sizes available for both standard and more uncommon door sizes, eliminating the need to get a specialty piece made.  These kick plates are also available with two different mounting options.  While some people may find the security of screw mounted kick plates necessary, like in restaurants, the is another option.  Magnetic mount kick plates make it possible to save doors from scuffs and damage without having to add extra holes into them.  This is ideal for rental homes and even for apartment buildings.  Adhesive mounts are also available on most products.  Just let us know what mount option works best for you!

Written by antiqueswriter

August 15, 2011 at 8:41 am