Period Style Hardware

Period Style & Antique or Vintage Hardware

Archive for the ‘Mission’ Category

Antique and Victorian Style Door Hinges

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When you hear the word ‘Victorian’ in relation to anything architectural or decorative chances are you mine immediately creates the image of something very elaborate or elaborately decorated.  The Victorian era was filled with people trying to constantly outdo each other when it came to buildings and decorating your home, resulting in flourishes and carving and embellishments on everything possible.  Items that were previously only made very simply, like door hinges and door knobs, were soon exhibiting much more intricate designs.  While some items received more attention to detail than others, particularly larger furniture pieces, it was obvious that attention was being paid to every item now instead of just a select few.

Ball Tip Hinge

Ball Tip Hinge

Door hinges were always something that was seen as nothing more than a functional necessity in homes, and no one ever really thought to add any sort of design element to them.  Fortunately someone soon realized how much of an improvement a little detail could make in a home and started decorating every piece of hardware, particularly door hinges.

Steeple Tip Hinge

Steeple Tip Hinge

The trick of the hinges is that the designs that were so carefully carved and embossed on them could only be seen when the doors are open, which leads people to have a more open and inviting home.  The more decorative hinges someone has in their home, the friendly and more generous they were thought to be.

Antique Brass East Lake Hinge

Antique Brass East Lake Hinge

Show your friends and loved ones how friendly and generous you are by switching out your plain door hinges with these more elaborate Victorian ones.  They add a touch of elegance to even the most modestly decorated home, and blend in with any decorating style.  They are available in several different finishes, making them easy to match with any current hardware you have in your home.  As always, we include any mounting hardware you will need to ensure that these match your home perfectly.

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Craftsman Mail Slots

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     If you have ever seen a Craftsman style home you can appreciate all of the hard work and thought that goes into decorating them and making sure that every last detail is perfect.  One of these details that is often overlooked on other styles of homes is the mail slot.  While these usually aren’t installed as functional pieces any more, they still add a special touch that makes the front door seem a little more finished and inviting as opposed to being a solid piece that can often seem cold and uninviting.

The oil-rubbed bronze variety of finish is most popular for a craftsman style decor.

 

     The Craftsman style does not have an intricately decorated feel to it.  Instead, the focus is on how various pieces are created, and using materials and craftsman that are local rather than using a mass-marketed piece.  The simple four square cutout design found in each corner adds just enough detail to make the piece distinguishable from any mass produced items.  Since they are hand forged and decorated it is almost expected that each piece be slightly different than the next with no two exactly alike.  The ability to let these flaws occur and appreciate them rather than turn your nose up at them sets the Craftsman style apart from many other different architectural styles.  Some of the homes that utilize these mail slots actually do have them installed as functional pieces. This craftsman/mission style mail slot is perfect for craftmen or mission style homes. The simple design lends itself to this style which focused on the quality of hand craftsmanship over perfection in design.

 

     These pieces are available in the oil rubbed bronze, antique brass and polished brass and come in two different sizes.  It is important that you measure your current mail slot before ordering to ensure that you get the right size piece for your door.  Oil rubbed bronze is the most popular choice when it comes to hardware and decorating a Craftsman style house, and really makes a huge statement that the polished brass cannot.  All necessary mounting hardware is included in the purchase of these pieces.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 29, 2011 at 8:29 am

Mission Revival and Craftsman Drawer Pulls

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     The Mission Revival Style was an architectural movement that began in the late 19th century for a colonial style’s revivalism and reinterpretation, which drew inspiration from the late 18th and early 19th century Spanish missions in California.  The  movement enjoyed its greatest popularity between 1890 and 1915, through numerous residential, commercial, and institutional structures, particularly with schools and railroad depots, that used this easily recognizable architectural style.

    The Mission Revival style is often lumped in with the Craftsman style, and for good reason.  Not only do the two styles overlap one another, but they are also very similar in style and inspiration.  Both styles embraced very simplistic styles and made their main focus was using local materials and artists to create various pieces of hardware and furniture.

     These styles of homes embrace the Craftsman philosophy completely.  Since these styles of homes have generated a very strong following it is quite easy to find a variety of different hardware options to help the homeowners maintain the Craftsman philosophy.  While some homeowners focus on the structure itself many others put their efforts into the furniture and hardware of the home to make sure it all fits in the Craftsman style.

     The choices people have for drawer hardware is extensive, and narrowing it down by architectural style doesn’t make that much of a dent in the options, especially with these styles.  The most common choices for drawer pulls are very simple ring designs.  The plusses for this option is that they can help convert any simple piece of furniture into more of a Craftsman style quite easily, and look great on any piece.

 

There are many different finishes available as well, and no one finish looks better than another because of the simplicity of it, and they blend with each other quite nicely.  This means you can have one room with primarily polished brass accents and another with oil rubbed bronze or chrome.  The different finishes can give very different impressions allowing an even further expression of a person’s personality.  All of the drawer pulls include the mounting hardware, making it a quick and easy upgrade to any room in your home.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 23, 2011 at 8:29 am

Pueblo Style

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     The Pueblo Style, also known as the Pueblo Revival Style is commonly found in the Southewestern area of the United States, and gets its name from the Pueblos as well as Spanish Missions in New Mexico.  This architectural style didn’t show up until the beginning of the 20th century and was at its height during the 1920’s and 1930’s, though it is still extremely popular today.  The Pueblo style is especially iconic in the state of New Mexico.

     The Pueblo style looks very similar to the adobe construction that inspired it, though most times brick and concrete are used instead of the traditional clay.  This is primarily because it is easier, and often cheaper to use and can produce better results than with its traditional ingredients.  Rounded corners, and thick walls are used to create the look and feel of adobe, and walls are usually created in a stucco fashion and painted in earth tones to further the simulation.  These tones also help the buildings blend into the landscapes better, which is a feature in the Southwest. Key components of the Pueblo Revival are the use of earthy materials, enclosed courtyards and flat or sloping roofs with parapets.

     One of the first buildings created in the Pueblo Revival Style, and perhaps one of the most popular is at the University of New Mexico located in Albequerque, NM.  While only a handful of buildings were selected to be built in this style originally, over the years it has grown to encompass virtually the entire campus.

     Santa Fe, NM is also a city in which the Pueblo style dominates the architectural scene.  It started back in the 20’s and 30’s, and by 1957 a Historical Zoning Ordinance was put in place to mandate the use of the Pueblo and Territorial style on every new building in central Santa Fe.  It was so popular and accepted by everyone that the ordinance is still in effect today. One of the most famous (and earliest) Pueblo-style buildings in Santa Fe was the La Fonda Hotel.

     One of the advantages of a Pueblo-style building is protection from the elements, the thick clay/mud walls keeping out both heat and cold.

Written by antiqueswriter

June 14, 2011 at 12:33 pm

Fluted Glass Door Knobs

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Art Deco Fluted Glass Knobs

Art Deco Fluted Glass Knobs

Diamond-like sparkle when the light hits them right, these modern recreations of fluted glass knobs, bring style and elegance to your home. Fluted glass knobs experienced a boom in popularity during the 1920’s to the 1930’s. The style has its origins in the Victorian period, the Regency style, with solid brass construction and a polished brass finish is re-emerging as a popular choice.

Fluted Knobs

Fluted Knobs

 

The Regency Single Dummy Fluted Door Knob set includes Rosette Screws, Crystal Knob and Rosette Plates. There are many styles to choose from including Privacy Locking sets, Passage sets and Double Dummy. There are also many finishes available to match your particular decor; brushed nickel, antique brass, polished chrome and oil rubbed bronze.

The Single Dummy is for one side of a door and is most often applied to a non-latching door, or bi-fold closet doors. While designed in an antique fashion, the Fluted Glass Door Knobs are sized for standard doors with a 2 1/8 bore hole. The Regency Crystal Single Dummy Glass Door Knob with any choice of finish makes an excellent addition to any room of the home.  Matching the finish to your furniture’s hardware such as dresser drawer pulls or even bathroom faucets, be it antique brass, brushed nickel, oil rubbed bronze or polished chrome, can really pull the room together. Ceiling fans and even nightstand lamps can be matched to the finish and makes for a well designed décor that will impress your friends and family, but most importantly, you’ll be satisfied.

Other Styles of Crystal Knobs

Other Styles of Crystal Knobs

Your love for the finer things, like quality Fluted Glass Door Knobs will show in your selection of antique styled hardware from LookInTheAttic.com. This hardware is perfect for matching Victorian period, 1920’s and 30’s or even eclectic styles of design for your home. Many online stores carry these styles of knobs. Try ArtDecoHardware.com or LookInTheAttic.com for a wide variety of styles and colors.

Written by antiqueswriter

April 24, 2011 at 7:00 pm

Peephole Predecessor – Antique Hardware

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After much pondering and research, we have finally been able to uncover what this little beauty is….and if you can’t already tell from the title of this article, it is a peephole.  Well, it’s nothing like what we normally think of when we think of peepholes, but that’s because back when this piece was manufactured, they didn’t have many of the materials we use today.

This peephole has two parts, and was designed to have one part, the small round one, on the inside of your door, while the other piece would line up on the outside.  The outer piece also doubles as a door knocker, which fits snugly around the hole.  Peepholes like these were extremely popular in more upscale homes, as well as with those who were cautious of who would be coming in and out of their homes.

Peephole

This piece does require some installation work outside of a couple of screws.  Most doors do not come with pre-cut holes in them for a peephole, so you will have to drill this yourself, or get someone you know to do it for you.  Even if you do currently have a peephole in your door, it’s probably not nearly as large as this one and will have to be enlarged.

This would be a truly wonderful piece to adorn any front door, and will be available in a variety of finishes so it will be sure to match whatever hardware you choose in your home.  This would also be absolutely adorable on a kid’s clubhouse to keep boys, girls, or even parents out.  It would also be a nice touch on any man cave and would be incredibly useful to keep any unwanted persons out during the big game, unless of course, they come bearing food.  Where else would you use this piece?

Written by antiqueswriter

April 5, 2011 at 8:36 am

Not Your Average Piece of Junk

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It’s been awhile since we’ve featured any door knockers. We don’t want everyone to think that we specialize in just drawer pulls and knobs. We actually pride ourselves in being able to supply our customers with a wide variety of antique and replica pieces from around the world. We want to give everyone the opportunity to capture the old world classic feel without always having to pay an exorbitant price.

While sometimes it seems like we feature more of one type of piece than another, most times it is because it is what we are really and truly excited about showing to you. True, there are certain items, like drawer pulls, that we do seem to feature more of, but that’s mainly because they are so abundant. These types of pieces account for a good third of our stock, but that’s also because they account for the same, if not more, in homes. Just think of how many dressers and cabinets you have in your house compared to doors, mailboxes, light fixtures, etc.

Rusty Drawer Handle

This piece is no exception. Yes, it’s another drawer pull and yes it needs a really good cleaning, but take a good look at it. You can tell that this piece was handmade by the simple craftsmanship that went in to it. There is a great amount of detail work on the back piece of it, which makes it a gorgeous accent to any piece of furniture. The assembly, where the handle itself attaches to the rest of the piece, is nothing more than a simple loop of metal to hold it in place. Unlike many modern pieces that may come in two, three, or four parts, this simple one piece construction sets it apart from its more modern counterparts.

We really like how the dark of the rust sets of the piece, and while we won’t use rust a finish, we will used oiled bronze as well as copper and probably cast iron as well. Let us know what you think?